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Shorland Medal: an appreciation

I am greatly honoured to receive the Shorland Medal from the cross-disciplinary New Zealand Association of Scientists. "The Shorland Medal is awarded in recognition of major and continued contribution to basic or applied research that has added significantly to...

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World map of the kelp biome updated

World map of the kelp biome updated

The first world map of the laminarian kelp biome has been published (Jayathilake and Costello (2020).  It estimates the kelp biome to occupy 1,469,900 km2 and be present on 22 % of the world’s coastline. It is thus the second most widely distributed marine biome,...

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A pack ice poem about polar ecology: THE PROTOPLASMIC CYCLE

THE PROTOPLASMIC CYCLE Big floes have little floes all around about 'em, And all the yellow diatoms couldn't do without 'em. Forty million shrimplets feed upon the latter, And they make the penguin and the seals and whales Much fatter. Along comes the Orca and kills...

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Curious species names

Sometimes we may need some examples of curious things about the use of species names. Here are some resources: Species names that are puns, tautonyms, rhymes, seriously long, and other useful and amusing information at Curious Taxonomy Naming species as an insult to...

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How can scientists agree to a list of all species?

How can scientists agree to a list of all species?

No single list of all the world's species' names has been agreed by scientists. Some taxa have no list, and some, especially the more popular mammals and birds have several. In a recent paper, we proposed a plan to address this that involves collaboration between the...

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Mapping top-30% of oceans paper wins international award

The Elsevier Atlas Advisory Board chooses an award-winning Atlas article from across all Elsevier journal portfolios based on their potential social impact. The paper, led by Qianshuo Zhao and from his PhD work, included PhD student Dinusha Jayalathilake, and used a...

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AI is a promising new tool for monitoring marine biodiversity

Artificial Intelligence (AI, using machine learning and neural networks) has made amazing strides, notably in recognising human faces. It is also being used to identify patterns on photographs of individual patterns on whale fins and flukes, and whale shark markings....

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